*** WE'RE MOVING! ***
Please visit us at our new storybook home on the web:

http://storybookers.com/


The Witch's House (see photo section for this and other storybook homes).
(More storybook photos below.)

LATEST NEWS:
** Storybookers online mailing list **
** Los Angeles Times article (January 2005) **
** Witch's House gallery **
** Chaplin Court update **
** Pyke House gallery **



This page is devoted to the appreciation of what has come to be called storybook style architecture: those charming, whimsical, often one-of-a-kind structures which defy and transcend standard architectural conventions to achieve something entirely new: a unique blend of art and architecture, whimsy and practicality, fantasy and reality.

We're just getting started here, but hope to grow considerably in the near future. The eventual goal is to create an online collection of profiles covering the construction, history, location, and other details of storybook style buildings—along with information on some of the architects responsible for these magnificent structures. For the moment, though, we'll content ourselves with a few choice photos of gorgeous storybooks we've come to know and love.

Reader comments and contributions are welcome—so if you know of a storybook style building not included here, drop us a line and tell us about it. If you've taken a good photo, send that too, so we can share it with our readers (and give you a photo credit, of course). Those who send 10 or more photos we use on the site will be listed (with bio) on the storybook scouts page.

Information on storybook architects, homeowners, and builders, as well as books, articles, and other materials (including website graphics) dealing with storybook architecture are also welcome.

Much of the current storybook site is still under construction, so please bear with us. Once we have enough material on hand, we'll be launching a separate website. You can reach us at: storybook@johnrobertmarlow.com

Check back often! We'll be adding new photos every week (and moving most to other pages to speed the front page loading time)...






Storybook Style: America's Whimsical Homes of the Twenties

Storybook Style: America's Whimsical Homes of the Twenties is the only book we know to be devoted entirely to storybook architecture. Written by Arrol Gellner and photographed by Douglas Keister, the book briefly details the history of the style, and contains many beautiful pictures. Click the book cover at left to find the book on amazon.com.











The Witch's House (aka Spadena House).

The Witch's House: Also known as the Spadena House, this is one of the earliest and most magnificent storybook homes ever built. The structure is currently undergoing an extensive restoration. The owner plans to restore the visible exterior to its former dilapidated glory, duplicating the original appearance while adding more living space at the back. This home appears on pp22-23 of
Storybook Style. For more information and photos of the Witch's House in the 1920s and in 2005, click here for gallery.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)





Storybook court apartments.

Chaplin Court: A storybook court commissioned by Charlie Chaplin and featuring several apartments arranged around an inner courtyard. Click here for gallery.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)




















Storybook cottage home.

A storybook cottage with dual walkways, nestled among trees. A similar photo of this home appears on p49 of Storybook Style. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)















Storybook complex, one of three buildings.

Part of a masterful storybook complex of three buildings constructed after World War II. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)





















Pyke House.

Pyke House, built in 1926. The influence of English Tudor style on storybook architecture can be clearly seen in this home. Click here for more.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)













Storybook court apartments.

Disney Court: A storybook court, consisting of apartments around a central courtyard. Built by Ben Sherwood in 1931, and almost certainly the inspiration for the home of the seven dwarves in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. This court is shown from a different angle on pp30-31 of Storybook Style (which incorrectly dates the complex to 1927, and mistakenly names the builder as Robert Sherwood). Gallery coming soon.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)





Storybook cottage home.

A storybook cottage home with leafy arch over entrance gate. This home appears on p50 of Storybook Style. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)











Large storybook cottage home.

A large storybook cottage, with part of matching garage visible at right. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)
















Storybook court apartments.

Storybook court apartments. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)























The Tam O'Shanter Restaurant.

The Tam O'Shanter Restaurant in Los Angeles. A similar photo of this building appears on p24 of Storybook Style. More info and photos (including interiors) coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)










Large storybook cottage.

An exceptionally large (at least three floors) storybook cottage home with a charming ivy-covered drawbridge entrance at upper right. According to Storybook Style (which shows this home from another angle on p49), Humphrey Bogart lived here from 1938-1940. More info and photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)









Storybook home with prominent roof.

A storybook home with an unusually large roof surface. Believe it or not, there is room for windows beneath the eaves. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)












Storybook house with crennelated roofline.

This storybook home features a crennelated roofline toward the rear—an unusual detail in non-castle-type storybooks. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)












Normandy Village.

Normandy Village, designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. This storybook fort with interior courtyard is featured on pp61-63 (and the cover) of Storybook Style. Many, many additional photos coming soon. (Photo by Jay Cross)











Small storybook house.

This unusual storybook home derives much of its charm from large-house features executed in miniature (note the size of the centrally-placed entrance door for a true sense of scale). (Photo by John Robert Marlow)










Classic storybook home with exceptionally crafted seawave roof.

This classic storybook home features a magnificently crafted seawave roof. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)











Classic storybook home.

Another classic storybook home. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)





















Crossroads of the World, a storybook office complex.

The Crossroads of the World: a storybook office complex forms part of this development, built in the 1930s. Though open at both ends, the two lines of storybook structures facing each other across a shady walkway resembles the "storybook court" layout (storybook buildings arranged around a central courtyard). More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)







A classic storybook home.

A classic storybook home featuring a small turret faced with simulated stone. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)













A rare double-turret storybook home.

A rare two-turret storybook with another rare feature—a unusually thick towers which manage to retain the storybook charm so often compromized when turrets become thick enough to useful as anything but stairs. (Even so, the size of the right turret causes this home to veer toward the storybook castle category.) Wanting to replace the aging wood roof with new wood, the owner found that the local fire code would not allow it. Determined to keep the home's storybook look intact, he contracted with a storybook roof specialist to duplicate the old seawave look (as closely as possible) with modern shingles. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)





Storybook home with carport.

An unusual storybook home with carport. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)



















Storybook home with thick turret.

A storybook home with an unusually thick turret. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)
















Asymmetrical storybook home.

All storybooks are asymmetrical, this one particularly so. Additional gables on the home's left side (not visible in this photo) serve to balance the home's appearance. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)
















Storybook home with two front-facing gables.

Storybook home with two front-facing gables. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)















Storybook home with centrally-placed chimney.

Storybook home with roofscape surrounding a centrally-placed chimney. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)
















Classic storybook home with magnificent seawave roof.

This classic storybook home features an absolutely magnificent seawave roof. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)














Two-turret storybook with seawave roof.

Another rare two-turret storybook. Note the open-water effect of sun glinting off the seawave roof. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)
















Storybook home, possibly by Yelland.

This interesting storybook home may have been designed by architect William Raymond Yelland, whose masterwork is the Normandy Village complex. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)












Unusual storybook by Yelland.

Unusually-shaped storybook designed by architect William Raymond Yelland, whose masterwork is the Normandy Village complex. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)












The old Tupper and Reed building, now home to Beckett's Irish Pub (designed by architect William Raymond Yelland).

The Tupper and Reed building, constructed in 1925 by architect William Raymond Yelland, who also designed Normandy Village. Originally home to a music business owned by John C. Tupper and Lawrence Reed, the structure now houses Beckett's Irish Pub, and is open to the public. A portion of this building (which housed the Cafe Piper at the time) is shown on page 85 of Storybook Style. More photos coming soon. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)














Unusual storybook by Yelland.

Unusual storybook designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)
















Exceptional common storybook by Yelland.

Exceptional common storybook designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)





















Common storybook, possibly by Yelland.

Common storybook, possibly designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)
















Beautifully-proportioned common storybook, possibly by Yelland.

Beautifully-proportioned common storybook, possibly designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)





















Common storybook, possibly by Yelland.

Common storybook, possibly designed by architect William Raymond Yelland. (Photo by Michael D. Greenslade)






















Group of storybooks by Yelland.

Charming group of storybook buildings by architect William Raymond Yelland. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)






Storybook by Yelland; see also photo above.

Storybook by Yelland; probably a different angle on the building at right in photo above. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)









Large storybook structure by Yelland.

Large storybook structure by Yelland. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)









Large storybook home by Yelland.

Large storybook home by Yelland. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)













Another angle on Yelland home above.

Large storybook home by Yelland; probably another angle on building in photo above. Note the period car parked at left. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)









Large storybook by Yelland.

Another large storybook by Yelland. Date and location unknown. (Photo courtesy Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, via Michael D. Greenslade)

















Another angle on Yelland home above.

Storybook entrance to a court of studio apartments designed by Einar C. Petersen and built in 1922. This court is pictured on page 21 of Storybook Style (which incorrectly dates the complex to 1919). More photos coming soon.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)








Pink storybook home with seawave roof.

A pink storybook home with seawave roof. More photos coming soon. (Photo by John Robert Marlow)


















Chateau Lemoine.

An unusual, possibly storybook home called "Chateau Lemoine."   (Photo by J. K. Gold)

















Common storybook.

A common storybook with an uncommon roof. More photos coming soon.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)















Classic storybook.

A classic storybook home, More photos coming soon.   (Photo John Robert Marlow)
















Common storybook.

A common storybook.   (Photo by John Robert Marlow)

















Common storybook.

Another common storybook home.   (Photo John Robert Marlow)




















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